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Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

External Research Fellow

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Email: paserman@bu.edu

[CV] [webpage]

Daniele Paserman

Daniele Paserman received his B.A. in economics and statistics from the Hebrew University in 1993, and his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2000. He is currently a Professor of Economics at Boston University, a Research Affiliate of CEPR, and a Research Fellow at IZA and CReAM. His research on immigration looks at how the initial environment affects the educational and labor market outcomes of immigrants, both in the short and in the long run; how immigrants affect the human capital accumulation of native workers; how immigration affects the labor market outcomes of native workers, recognizing that the effect need not be uniform over time; and how highly skilled immigrants affect the productivity and investment behavior of firms. Most of this research draws inspiration from the large migration wave experienced by Israel since the fall of the Berlin Wall from the Soviet Union and other Eastern bloc countries. From this episode it is possible to draw important insights on the assimilation of migrants, on their impact on the host economy, and on other issues that are of central importance in economics and the social sciences, even outside of the Israeli context. Other lines of research include behavioral models of search in the labor and marriage markets, and a project on the dynamics of violence in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, which attempts to use these dynamics to understand the strategies of militant groups and of the central government that is fighting against them.

Daniele Paserman joined CReAM as an external fellow in February 2007.